Question 17: Which obligations in the professional code of conduct frustrate clients most and how could client expectations be met while respecting the objectives behind those rules?

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As background, please read excerpts from our discussion paper The Future of Legal Services in Canada: Trends and Issues and join the conversation below.

“The growth of electronic communications, including social networking, will not only change how interactions may take place in the future, but also the expectations of a new generation of clients and lawyers on how business should be conducted and how services should be delivered – quickly, directly, and, in many cases, online.”

Executive Summary, Page 5.

“Demographics will play an important role in the future of the legal industry in Canada. The number of practicing lawyers in Canada is growing at a rate faster than the general population. While more women and historically marginalized groups are entering the profession, there are still few women in top management positions in firms.”

Executive Summary, Page 5.

“The challenges brought on by globalization and technology will also affect the regulation and oversight of the legal profession. Developments such as multi-jurisdictional practices (MJP) will require more cooperation and harmonization, nationally and internationally. Law firm ownership by non-lawyers will raise professional and regulatory questions regarding competence, conflicts of interest, confidentiality, independence, and fidelity to law and other related issues.”

Executive Summary, Page 5.

Question 17: Which obligations in the professional code of conduct frustrate clients most and how could client expectations be met while respecting the objectives behind those rules?

Consider this: What if law societies looked to preventative measures at law firms to avoid misconduct rather than discipline?

Join the conversation | Consultation paper

June 18, 2013 |
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